Historic Mining and Agriculture as Indicators
of Occurrence and Abundance of Widespread
Invasive Plant Species

Identifier

Title

Historic Mining and Agriculture as Indicators
of Occurrence and Abundance of Widespread
Invasive Plant Species

Description

Anthropogenic disturbances often change ecological communities and provide opportunities for non-native species invasion. Understanding the impacts of disturbances on species invasion is therefore crucial for invasive speciesmanagement. We used generalized linear mixed effects models to explore the influence of land-use history and distance to roads on the occurrence and abundance of two invasive plant species (Rosa multiflora and Berberis thunbergii) in a 900-ha deciduous forest in the eastern U.S.A., the Powdermill Nature Reserve. Although much of the reserve has been continuously forested since at least 1939, aerial photos revealed a variety of land-uses since then including agriculture, mining, logging, and development. By 2008, both R. multiflora and B. thunbergii were widespread throughout the reserve (occurring in 24% and 13% of 4417 10-m diameter regularly-placed vegetation plots, respectively) with occurrence and abundance of each varying significantly with land-use history. Rosa multiflora was more likely to occur in historically farmed, mined, logged or developed plots than in plots that remained forested, (log odds of 1.8 to 3.0); Berberis thunbergii was more likely to occur in plots with agricultural, mining, or logging history than in plots without disturbance (log odds of 1.4 to 2.1). Mining, logging, and agriculture increased the probability that R. multiflora had >10% cover while only past agriculture was related to cover of B. thunbergii. Proximity to roads was positively correlated with the occurrence of R. multiflora (a 0.26 increase in the log odds for every 1-m closer) but not B. thunbergii, and roads had no impact on the abundance of either species. Our results indicated that a wide variety of disturbances may aid the introduction of invasive species into new habitats, while high-impact disturbances such as agriculture and mining increase the likelihood of high abundance post-introduction.

Source

PLoS ONE., Vol. 10 Issue 6, p1-15. 15p.

Publisher

PLoS ONE., Vol. 10 Issue 6, p1-15. 15p.

Date

Jun., 2015

Format

PDF

Language

Item Relations

This item has no relations.

Files

Historic Mining and Agriculture as Indicators.pdf

Citation

Calinger, Kellen Calhoon, Elisabeth Chang, Hsiao-chi Whitacre, James Wenzel, John Comita, Liza Queenborough, Simon, “Historic Mining and Agriculture as Indicators
of Occurrence and Abundance of Widespread
Invasive Plant Species,” Uwekind Resource Centre, accessed May 26, 2024, http://library.uwekind.com/items/show/398.